How We Help

Patient Advocates do not provide medical services or medical or legal advice and are not a substitute for medical or other professional care.

If you believe you are having a medical emergency, please call 9-1-1 or go the nearest emergency room.

Some Examples*

Helping HandsWith 30 years experience working inside our healthcare system, we help our clients to:

  • Understand their diagnosis and treatment options
  • Make informed decisions for their care
  • Create and/or strengthen support systems, including medical teams
  • Provide research and sourcing for providers, including facilities
  • Assist with navigation of employment and health insurance benefits
  • Explain and negotiate insurance denials and provider bills

Here are some examples:

Newly diagnosed with cancer, John wanted to continue working while he was going through treatment. He wasn’t familiar with his disability benefits and his employer’s approach to FMLA so he could plan financially if he needed to take time away to focus on his health. John also wanted to research alternative medical treatments that he could safely use while undergoing traditional treatment. He wondered about when/if to consider clinical trials.

  • After reviewing John’s job description, disability policies, and medical coverage, Cindi was able to work with John’s physicians to complete FMLA paperwork so that John could continue to work but clearly address his needs for time off for treatment.
  • Research on herbal and other non-traditional treatments provided John information he needed for effective communication with his oncologist to utilize both traditional and alternative treatments.
  • Cindi also advised John on how his insurance coverage dealt with clinical trials and kept him abreast of new trials as they came up for which he might be a candidate.

 
Rachel had recently moved to assisted living and although managing relatively independently she was living with kidney, heart, and liver conditions, necessitating frequent doctor’s visits. Her daughter lived in another state and was also concerned about her mother’s mild memory impairment. In addition Rachel didn’t know how to monitor what her insurance was paying and what was her responsibility to pay.

  • After a family meeting, Rachel agreed she would like support attending her doctor’s visits and verifying her medications with the facility.
  • Cindi’s attendance at doctor’s appointments and reviewing changes and recommendations with both Rachel, her daughter, and the assisted living staff increased their confidence in Rachel’s well-being and the staff’s ability to notice changes that could indicate early problems.
  • With Rachel’s agreement, Cindi set up on line accounts for Rachel’s Medicare and Medigap plans, and was able to reconcile bills and insurance payments. She discovered over $1000 in errors the first year.

 


Paperwork by Chris of the HuntBrad
received physical therapy services following a shoulder surgery that he later learned weren’t covered when his insurance benefits changed during the course of his treatment. 

Determining that the provider had failed to verify his benefits, Cindi was able to negotiate with the provider to reduce the charges by more than half.

 

Elena had been named her mother’s guardian following multiple hospitalizations. Her mother had allowed her medical insurance to lapse and Elena was facing medical bills in excess of $100,000. Cindi was able to reduce the bills by more than 70% leaving more of Elena’s mother’s assets to provide her ongoing care.

*These are composites of actual patients, however details have been modified to protect patient privacy.